You are currently browsing the archives for the Objects category.

Reflections on Reduction: my experience of conservation bleaching a textile

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett Leave a comment

by Scarlet Faro, 2nd year student, MPhil Textile Conservation. In my second year on the MPhil Textile Conservation, one of the objects I worked on was a hand-made cotton cutwork lace jabot, part of the collection at Dumfries Museum and Camera Obscura. A jabot is a decorative neckwear accessory, worn to conceal the front opening… Continue reading

A Scrumptiously Soiled Surface: Methods for Creating Artificial Soiling

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett 1 Comment

By Tabby Gibbs, Second Year Student, MPhil Textile Conservation An important part of the textile conservation planning process is testing, testing…and more testing! Before any decisions can be made about how to treat any object, we need to fully understand the materials and degradation products that are present. A great way of carrying out initial… Continue reading

Sweet Decadence: The Treatment of a 1950s Couture Dress

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett 2 Comments

by Lauren Van Dessel, 2nd yr student, MPhil Textile Conservation As part of the MPhil Textile Conservation programme, students complete their first year by undertaking a summer placement in a conservation lab. This summer, I was lucky enough to fulfil my placement at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF). One of the reasons… Continue reading

Mix, stir and match: the complexities of dyeing conservation support fabrics

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett 1 Comment

By Kirstin Ingram, Second year student, MPhil Textile Conservation Dyeing support fabrics can sometimes feel like witchcraft even with synthetic dyes: you mix potions together, stir at a boiling pot, and turn a piece of undyed fabric into any colour of the rainbow. However, sometimes this magic can involve a lot of trial and error… Continue reading

Horsing Around: Identifying Horsehair in Historic Textiles

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett 4 Comments

By Tabby Gibbs, First Year Student, MPhil Textile Conservation As we are now well into the second semester, my fellow first years and I have been reflecting on the vast amount we learnt in the first term. One of the things I particularly enjoyed studying was microscopy; the ability to tell different fibres apart through… Continue reading

Beautifully embellished with beadwork

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett 1 Comment

by Nicole Giacomantonio, recent graduate. I was very fortunate to spend the last month at the Kelvin Centre for Conservation and Cultural Heritage Research to undertake the final stage of treatment on a 1920s’ gold beaded dress belonging to Glasgow Museums. The dress (E.1973.62.b) was originally purchased from Murielle’s of Sauchiehall St in Glasgow and… Continue reading

Cleaning in puddles – a modified approach for a fragile textile

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett 2 Comments

By Erinn Dunlea, first year student, MPhil Textile Conservation. Conservators must tailor each conservation treatment to the needs of the object in their care. This can be informed by the object’s nature, condition, and the context and objectives of the treatment. This past semester I undertook the conservation of a length of fabric which belongs… Continue reading

Arsenic and old…..hats?

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett Leave a comment

by Callie Jerman, second year student, MPhil Textile Conservation It’s strange sometimes how themes can re-occur throughout a project or course.  For the current second-year students one theme of the semester was ‘pesticides’.  Historic pesticide use in museums is a huge problem, as a wide variety of toxins were applied to objects, starting in the… Continue reading

A stitch in time – conserving an Arts & Crafts embroidery

Published on: Author: sarahfoskett Leave a comment

by Caterina Celada Prior. MPhil Textile Conservation, student graduate 2020. In January 2020, I started working on the conservation of what would be my final project of the programme. This was a beautifully embroidered panel in the Arts & Crafts style attributed in design and execution (c. 1880-1905) to Maggie Hamilton. This painter and embroiderer… Continue reading