Conservation of an Edo fire fighting cape: Costume and class in Early Modern Japan

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By Nora Frankel, second year student, MPhil Textile Conservation. For me, getting a new object for treatment in our second semester ‘Principles and Practice’ class is always met with excitement and anticipation.  When I lifted the tissue paper off what was to be my final project after reading the short description and client brief, I… Continue reading

Filtered Light on Light-Sensitive Dyes: A Pilot Project

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  By Dr Anita Quye, Lecturer in Conservation Science, Centre for Textile Conservation. Exposing textiles coloured with light-sensitive natural and synthetic dyes to light is risky. Even under controlled museum conditions with ultraviolet and short wavelength visible light removed, these dyes can fade. Why? Because visible light still has enough energy to change the molecular structures… Continue reading

The conservation of an 1820s cap (if something so extravagant can be called such).

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Ultrasonic humidification restored the shape and appearance of the cap ©CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection and University of Glasgow, 2016.

by Nora Frankel, 2nd year student, MPhil Textile Conservation. Wet cleaning of historic textiles for conservation is a surprisingly complex process. As textiles in collections can often contain degraded fibres, multiple layers and mixed materials, the practical and ethical decisions of washing increase drastically.  While wet cleaning may benefit some materials, it can potentially cause… Continue reading

Jing Han receives a prestigious China Scholarship Council award

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Jing Han and UPLC

Many congratulations to Jing Han who has been selected by the China Scholarship Council for their prestigious annual National Excellent Self-Funded Students Scholarship. The scholarship is in recognition of Jing’s academic excellence for her PhD research of traditional Chinese textile dyes at the CTC supervised by Dr Anita Quye and Prof Nick Pearce, for which… Continue reading

Lessons in Colour: Washing a 19th Century Sampler

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by Aisling Macken, first year student, MPhil Textile Conservation. As first year students at the Centre for Textile Conservation, we learn a variety of methods to clean a textile, and this year the most important method is undoubtedly the process of wet cleaning. As part of the wet cleaning module that takes place during the… Continue reading

A ‘bumper’ year: Open Day 2016

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By Professor Nick Pearce, Trustee of the Textile Conservation Foundation and Richmond Chair of Fine Arts, University of Glasgow. The Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History opened its doors again on Friday 18th March. Open Day at the Centre is an annual opportunity for those within and outwith the University to see and… Continue reading

Spreading the word: giving a talk at Edinburgh College of Art

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by Hannah Vickers, Harriet Perkins, Michelle Hunter, 2nd Year Students, MPhil Textile Conservation. Recently, the three of us paid a visit to Edinburgh College of Art to talk to Textile students and Embroiderers’ Guild members about textile conservation. On an intensive, specialised course, it’s easy to forget how to describe and explain what we do… Continue reading

Tricky “textiles”

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Figure 2: Thinking inside the box - tweezers, glass weights and a lot of concentration helped in the 5 hours detangling process.  © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection and University of Glasgow, 2016.

by Hannah Sutherland, 2nd year student MPhil Textile Conservation The term textile can mean many things to different people and across museum collections. The requirement of a “textile” conservator to work on items which are not textiles in the traditional sense can vary depending on institution collection, institution staffing or personal specialism. As we head… Continue reading

New staff

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Barkcloth (tapa), patterned (115cm x 71cm), Fiji, Melanesia

Frances Lennard, Senior Lecturer in Textile Conservation. We recently gained three new members of staff who are all working on the AHRC-funded project, Situating Pacific Barkcloth Production in Time and Place. This three-year project has just started – you can find more information about it on the project website: www.tapa.gla.ac.uk Misa Tamura is our Research… Continue reading

Deconstructing the Artefact: Uncovering the origin of a leather pot

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GLAHM 112806 © The Hunterian, University of Glasgow.

by Harriet Perkins, 2nd year student, MPhil Textile Conservation. When a conservator is first presented with an object it is important to find out as much information about it as possible. This informs the conservator of the significance of the object, construction and materials used as well as indicating the causes of deterioration. As part… Continue reading